Monday, September 5, 2016

Sir Isaac Brock Memorial

The memorial in Brockville to Sir Isaac Brock stands to the north of Court House Square overlooking Courthouse Avenue.


FOR ALL
WHO
SERVED


In honour of all our men and women
who have answered the call to arms
in defence of our homeland
along with the
Brockville Infantry Company (1862)
and The Brockville Rifles (1866).

Unveiled by Mayor David Henderson,
July 1st, Canada Day, marking the
Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II,
on the 150th anniversary of the
founding of the
Brockville Infantry Company (1862),


2012

175
BROCKVILLE
1832-2007


On the occastion of Brockville's 175th
Anniversary as an incorporated municipality,
the City recognizes the generosity of
community on the creation of the
General Sir Isaac Brock Memorial Gardens


•Brockville Community Foundation
•Brockville District Civitan Club
•Brockville Lions Club
•Brockville Municipal Accessibility Advisory Committee
•Brockville Lioness Club
•Fuller Group of Companies
•Legal Community of Brockville
•Loyal Orange Lodge #1 & Royal Black Preceptory #383

June 2008
Respectfully Appreciated:


David L. Henderson
Mayor of Brockville

David C. Paul
175th Anniversary Chair



Brockville was named after the Provisional Civil Administrator of
Upper Canada and the Commanding Officer of the British Forces
in Upper Canada during the War of 1812-14.
Gen. Sir Isaac Brock, K.C.B.
(1769 - 1812)

The government of Upper Canada first named this community "ELIZABETHTOWN" after moving the site of district administration here in 1809. The building of the first Court House and Gaol in the village was completed in 1810. The surrounding township was also named ELIZABETHTOWN, so the local citizens were searching for a different and generally acceptable name to apply to their new hamlet.

Following a period when the major landowners and citizens failed to agree on a suitable local name, the name "BROCKVILLE" was suggested in 1812.

Major-General Isaac Brock had previously led his troops and succeeded in winning the Battle of Detroit on August 16, 1812 by forcing the surrender of U.S. General, William Hull, and his garrison there. As a result of this action, General Brock was at the height of his popularity. The use of his name would, therefore, have been considered quite a coup for this young and growing village.

It was a terrible tragedy later when General Brock was shot and killed while leading a charge up the heights, west of the village of Queenston, Upper Canada, on October 13, 1812. He had been targeted by an American sharpshooter waiting amongs the enemy forces holding the top of the hill.

The "Saviour of Canada" was cut down defending the Niagara area from American invaders and his loss was a terrible shock to his troops and to most Canadians. A week later, official notice arrived by post that Isaac Brock had been selected to receive a knighthood from the King. After Brock's death, the King conferred on him KNIGHT COMMANDER OF THE BATH.

The name BROCKVILLE began to be used immediately, gaining the support of local political figures such as Charles Jones, William Buell, and other citizens. The name was approved by the Crown on June 3, 1813.

The bronze bust and stone monument nearby was proposed by the members of General Brock Chapter of the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (I.O.D.E). After eight years effort, the IODE. raised the funds for its creation and erection. The bust of General Sir Isaac Brock was created by Hamilton McCarthy of Ottawa, one of the leading sculptors of his day.

The monument to General Brock was unveiled during a ceremony here on August 19, 1912 in the centenary year of his death.

Erected by the City of Brockville, 2007
Research, design and layout by Douglas M. Grant



"HE WHO GUARDS NEVER SLEEPETH."

ERECTED BY
GENERAL BROCK CHAPTER
DAUGHTERS OF THE EMPIRE
IN MEMORY OF

MAJ. GEN. SIR ISAAC BROCK K.C.B.
PROVISIONAL LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
OF UPPER CANADA
WHO FELL OCTOBER 13TH 1812

FIGHTING FOR KING AND COUNTRY



HAMILTON
MACCARTHY
SCULP.
1912